#BlackLivesMatter……Sometimes

Nigga feelin’ hopeless

Starin’ at the idiot box, riddle me this

If a killer was a nigga would niggas still really care?

Cause niggas worser than Zimmerman livin’ life everywhere

-Wale

These lyrics are from Washington, D.C.,  based hip hop artist Wale’s song “The Pessimist” . This song tackles a few of the most pressing issues threatening African-American’s existence. The song’s most thought provoking moment occurs when Wale openly questions the actions of his indigenous community. Wale inquires if some even care about the pressing issue of murder as they only react when a Black Life is lost at the hands of whites. Considering the consistent occurrence of black-on-black violence, I believe this to be a particularly notable query.

With the recent murder of unarmed  Walter Scott Jr., at the hands of white police officer Michael Slager, the “Black Lives Matter” movement has been Black 4reinvigorated. While the African American community is well within its right to express righteous indignation when Black life falls unjustifiably at the hands of a white police officer, however, what bothers me is the reality that during the same weekend that Mr. Scott was murdered by a white police officer, there were 5 Blacks in Chicago who fell at the hand of a fellow African-American; bringing the Windy City’s 2015 murder count to 99.  Last year, 420 murders occurred in Chicago, the vast majority of the victims, and perpetrators were African-American. Unfortunately for Black Chicagoan’s, there was no national outcry. Most troubling is the reality that indifference to black-on-black homicide is relatively standard for today’s African-American community.

According to the FBI, over 90 percent of African-American homicides were committed by black offenders. In contrast, only 6 percent of black murder victims were slain by Whites. It is perfectly reasonable, understandable, and justified for the  African American community to rally against white officers senselessly murdering black citizens behind the banner of Black Lives Matter. However, it is unconscionably hypocritical for the same individuals to ignore much more frequent occurrences of black-on-black homicides.

Black activists and community leaders appear foolish when they express unfiltered outrage at the death’s of Trayvon Martin, Jordan Davis, and Michael Brown, Black 2while remaining silent in regards to the murder of Black men, women, and children by African-American offenders at a rate that would make George Zimmerman, Michael Dunn, and Darren Wilson shake their heads in disbelief. If the African-American community is not careful, it runs the risk of endorsing the belief that Black Lives ONLY Matter when they are extinguished by whites.

Put simply, African Americans lackadaisical  reaction to  black-on-black crime must cease immediately. I am of the opinion that we should oppose all crime regardless of the perpetrators race/ethnicity. In the end, unnecessary death is unnecessary death, regardless of the culprit’s race/ethnicity. It is only by vigilantly opposing every manifestation of murder that I will ever be convinced that Black Lives Matter. Until that occurs, I will hold fast to my fervent belief that Black Lives Matter, Sometimes.

Alexander Goodwin

#ManhoodRaceCulture

©Manhood, Race and Culture, 2015.

13 thoughts on “#BlackLivesMatter……Sometimes”

  1. It’s funny how Zulu and Xhosa might go to war
    Two tribal armies that want to build and destroy
    Remind me of these Compton crip gangs that live next door
    Beefin’ with Piru’s, only death settle the score
    So don’t matter how much I say I like to preach with the Panthers
    Or tell Georgia State “Marcus Garvey got all the answers”
    Or try to celebrate February like it’s my B-Day
    Or eat watermelon, chicken and Kool-Aid on weekdays
    Or jump high enough to get Michael Jordan endorsements
    Or watch BET cause urban support is important
    So why did I weep when Trayvon Martin was in the street?
    When gang banging make me kill a nigga blacker than me?
    Hypocrite! – Kendrick Lamar

  2. I agree with a lot of points in this article. Black people tend to really only care when white people are killing black people, but silent when there is plenty of black people killing black people and nobody will admit that and probably never will.

  3. Alex: I want to applaud you for having the courage to speak what is on your heart and mind. Too many young black males are losing their lives and those on the Right are content to stand by and act as if its their own fault.

  4. I concur with Mr. Goodwin. Let’s stop killing regardless of whose hands commit the crime. Nonetheless, we must be careful to ensure that this random killing of African Americans does not revert back to the old Jim Crow days where killing African Americans was just the way things were.

  5. I agree with this post, it is a shame that in the African-American community homicides are only relevant when it is done by a white offender. The proper term for this movement should be that All Lives Matter including blacks and whites.

    1. Sister Christine,

      You are right! ALL lives matter should be the proper term of the movement. Unfortunately, Black Lives Matter…sometimes has been the attitude that many African-Americans have carried for so long. I really enjoyed this post, finally someone has enough sense to write about what we’ve all been thinking about in the back of our minds and maybe in the forefronts of our conversations.

      1. I fervently believe that the reality that it is only Black lives that are being routinely extinguished that testifies to the fact that all lives other than Black matter. Hence, the emphasis upon Black Lives Matter. There is little need to emphasize other lives during this moment, Black lives are still under attack.

        1. Although, black lives are under attack, their are other ethnicities who’s lives hold the same value. Countries such as Armenia and Congo are rapidly killing groups of individuals based of their religious afflictions and Ethnic groups. To say that black lives hold more value is demeaning to those people whose lives will never be publicized.

          1. It is not demeaning at all. Particularly when one considers that the American race problem, which the “Black Lives Matter” mantra is being hurled at, is a domestic, meaning American issue. Now in regards to your larger point of the continual genocide of man-toward-man, I agree. However, it in no way lessens the need for African-Americans, the descendants of the most horrific genocide the world has ever known, a genocide that has been going on for over half of a millennium, gives them the right to assert that “Black Lives Matter” because no one, not even the ethnic/religious groups that you mention have ever come to their aid. So yes, “Black Lives Matter”, and they matter incredibly. Too bad that others refuse to acknowledge it.

  6. I 100% agree. African Americans only throw around the phrase “Black Lives Matter” when it’s a white man that kills one of our people. But when a black man kills another black man it’s dubbed as “just another day in the streets”. Not saying that the white man killing a black man is not a big deal, but I think the African American community should put as much attention to stop black-on-black crime, just as much as they do to stop on police-on-black crime.

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