WHY IS THE WHITE MALE SUPREMACIST SO ANGRY?: Lessons to be Learned from Charlottesville

It’s hard for most African-Americans to understand the existence of angry white males. This difficulty only increases with the realization that white men have historically held every advantage in this democratic nation. There is little room to debate that white males have historically been American industrial leaders preferred worker population. White males’ historical favored status leads most to question why he is currently behaving as if he has existed under a yoke of oppression that has been reserved for blacks for the past four centuries.

The genesis of white male anxiety and public expressions of anger is closely associated with increasing concerns regarding an evaporating privileged status. When one listens to the rhetoric being spewed by white supremacist leaders, the fear associated with white males’ expiring socioeconomic privileges is palpable. Predictably, for the vast majority of white men, the loss of their privileged position feels like they have fallen under the yoke of oppression.

Although most Americans consider any argument that paints the white male as an oppressed population, foolhardy; such a reaction does a severe disservice to the genuine socioeconomic issues facing white males. Nearly every discussion revolving around the angry white male conflates this highly diverse population into a monolithic group with a similar background (highly-educated, entrepreneurial, politically savvy, and financially prosperous) and singular goals (white world supremacy). Nothing could be further from the truth as the white male population is as diverse as any other American population with varying levels of educational achievement, occupational skill, and politicization. Such matters are critical to understanding the angry white male who assembled in Charlottesville, Virginia, in a desperate attempt to re-establish their ownership of America and inform all that they were prepared to resist every attempt to push them from center stage.

While most dismiss the antics of the angry white males such as those in Charlottesville who have found both brethren and a political voice within white supremacy groups, it is a phenomenon that must be noted and addressed by the nation. The angst of poorly educated and financially marginalized angry white males is understandable if one understands the flawed historical analysis that it rests on.

Make no mistake about it, the white male angst displayed in Charlottesville is directly attributable to a fallacious reading of American history. This reading of history places the white man as the central protagonist in every historical event; hence, it is not a quantum leap to expect those who have been indoctrinated with such information to believe that they are supposed to not only dictate what occurs in America but also reap the most significant politico-economic rewards from those events.

Political protests like Charlottesville communicates an obvious anger by white males at the realization that the world has shifted in a manner that their standing dinner reservation that has historically allowed them to skip to the front of a crowded line of groups grasping for politico power and economic resources has been canceled. It appears that a few white males finally understand that class has superseded race in American economic matters.

Unfortunately for angry white males, the realization that class concerns matter more than race has not led them to abandon the failed strategies of their economically marginalized ancestors who attacked other poor groups and not the elite as they sought to be the richest of the American poor. I am certain that it is painful for white supremacists to admit that they have been exploited by the white elites; figures such as Carnegie, Rockefeller, Gompers, and Trump.

This historical record indicates that elite whites have exploited poor and working-class whites whose only comfort was found in their superiority to blacks. Remarkably, the vast majority of poor and working-class whites fail to realize that their only escape form poverty in inextricably tied to other poor populations. Ironically, in a nation fixated on race, the solution to white workers plight is an accentuation on class.

It is truly a peculiar situation to watch angry white males avoid challenging white elites, their actual oppressors, and doom themselves to an endless struggle against other poor groups for the few crumbs that fall from the table of prosperity.

One can only wonder how long angry white males will continue to cower in the face of an American elite class and attack other poor groups who hold the key to their escape from economic exploitation. Although I am confident that this reality is excruciatingly painful for angry white males to accept, their oppressor looks just like them; he is white and male.

To the chagrin of angry white males, their oppressor is solely motivated by financial realities, not petty racial matters. It is the alluded to concern with financial power that has facilitated poor and working-class white males loss of favored worker status in the U.S. labor market. The cause of white male anger has little to do with a statue of Robert E. Lee and everything to do with the unavoidable reality that they are no longer the favored worker class in America. It is with this realization that I am requesting angry white males to stop blaming African-Americans for your economic decline, you know that we have no say in that matter, and turn your full-attention toward the elite (such as Donald Trump) whose pursuit of a dollar has placed you in this tenuous predicament. Whether you want to accept it or not, white elites could not care less who they exploit as long as it is hugely profitable.

Dr. James Thomas Jones III

How the Terrorist Attack by White Supremacist in Charlottesville is the Opening Shot in a Civil War for White America’s Soul

In a long forgotten admonishment, Malcolm X told white progressives that the most efficient manner that they could make a contribution to the struggle for racial equality is by returning to their indigenous community and combating white bigotry at that location.

In many ways, Malcolm’s sage advice was particularly poignant as it allowed progressive whites a glimpse of the virulent hatred that the white supremacist that call themselves the ‘Alt-Right’ harbor in their hearts and souls. Blacks have always believed that until progressive whites have been affected by the demonic possession that takes hold of such individuals that they can not comprehend the terror that has shadowed blacks for the past several centuries.

If nothing else, the recent terrorist attack in Charlottesville, Virginia provides whites with a clear view of the unbridled hatred and ‘by any means necessary’ politics that domestic terrorist groups such as the Ku Klux Klan, Knights of the White Camellia, and ‘Alt-Right’ have used against African-Americans for centuries. The hatred that I am referring to is a furious rage that seeks to destroy all that it contacts.

I am confident that for many progressive whites this most recent attack by white terrorists determined to rule this nation ‘by any means necessary’ reminds them of the ‘radical Islamic terrorist’ that Donald Trump railed against during his repeated criticisms of Barack Hussein Obama.

Most revealing has been Trump supporter and former Ku Klux Klan Grand Wizard David Duke insistence that the white supremacist who arrived in Charlottesville were putting action to Donald J. Trump’s promise to “make America great again.” I agree with Duke’s contention that the assembled white supremacists consider themselves Trump’s ‘storm troopers’ and this moment will be remembered as ‘a defining moment’ in how White America views itself.

For the first time since the founding of this nation, the white populace has witnessed the true wages of the socially constructed whiteness. It is difficult to argue against the assertion that the foremost symptoms of whiteness are a far-reaching social blindness and political ignorance that appears in the forms of xenophobia, racial bigotry, gender bias, and a general refusal to consider an alternative worldview that questions an omnipotent and omnipresent white privilege. Although difficult to consider, the loss of life that occurred in the Charlottesville protests may very well be the elusive threshold that causes sober-minded whites on both the left and the right of the aisle to finally recognize and take action against the lethal dangers associated with white domestic terrorism.

As always, the path to destroying white bigotry and institutional racism runs directly through White America. It will most certainly be interesting to watch their actions in the wake of a lethal domestic terrorist attack. Will they be able to join forces with like-minded individuals in a heroic struggle to extinguish white supremacy or will they cower in the face of white bigots who remind them that there is strength in numbers? Time will reveal which path well-meaning whites have chosen. More importantly, history will judge how they either confront or ignore this evil that has historically possessed the nation’s soul like a demonic spirit.

Dr. James Thomas Jones III

© Manhood, Race and Culture, 2017

What Black America Must Learn from the Unemployment of Colin Kaepernick and Suspension of Ezekiel Elliott

Public Disclaimer: I am a proud alum of THE Ohio State University and a lifetime fan of the Dallas Cowboys. I promise to let neither of those things significantly affect my reflections on what the 6-game suspension of Ezekiel Elliott means.

In the aftershocks surrounding Ezekiel Elliott’s 6-game suspension for violating the National Football League’s (NFL) ‘personal conduct’ policy, I have heard many of my African-American peers lament that the punishment dispensed by NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell as grossly unfair. A few have taken the step of insinuating that the fact that Elliott’s accuser is a white female is a deciding factor.

Although I consider Goodell’s punishment to be harsh when compared to prior league decisions regarding similar matters, I do not think that the Commissioner’s actions are attributable to any inherent personal prejudice or institutional racism in the NFL. However, I do believe that racial matters impacted the decision indirectly.

If one views the recent ruling regarding Elliott and the continuing unemployment of Colin Kaepernick from an unemotional position they would see that the decisions of Commissioner Goodell and team owners are motivated by rising concerns regarding league popularity; a polite way of referring to league finances. Put simply; the stewards of the NFL brand are caught in a peculiar predicament that forces them to do business in a manner that lessens the chances that those whites purchasing the bulk of game tickets remain loyal to the NFL brand.

When viewed in this light, it is apparent that Kaepernick’s difficulty in securing employment is an occurrence of collusion by NFL owners unwilling to offend patriotic whites who will never forgive the embattled figure for kneeling during the playing of the National Anthem. Elliott has likewise been sacrificed to appease women’s rights groups, many of which are filled with black women eager to follow their white ‘sisters’ lead in attacking the Dallas Cowboys running back regarding the highly questionable allegations. Make no mistake about it; the NFL realizes that if such groups disapprove of their handling of the Elliott case, their reaction will be furious and immediate.

In many ways, the most significant lesson that African-Americans can take from both matters is that regardless of the skills black workers possess, they are never so essential to operations that they can not be jettisoned the moment they affect bottom line financial realities. Although difficult for black workers to accept, when it comes to industry, they are never the machine performing the work, they are the grease that will be used until it is of no more use and then discarded.

We must never forget that for American Capitalists, it is ALWAYS about the money. And there is not a darn thing that Black Americans can do to alter that reality in this or any future life.

Dr. James Thomas Jones III

© Manhood, Race and Culture, 2017

Why the Panther Uniform and Panther Patrols Were So Important

While developing plans for a revolutionary organization, Newton considered every detail, including the uniform his cadre would wear. The Panther leader desired for the group’s image to serve as a “plus factor” that distinguished them from an ordinary street gang. According to historian Ula Taylor, Huey P. Newton “didn’t want people to see the Panthers as thuggish, gun-toting brothers without an organized agenda. He came up with the idea that all Panthers should wear neat, polished uniform–black slacks, ironed powder-blue shirts, black tie or turtleneck, black leather sports jacket.”   Seale explains the Panther uniforms importance below.

That uniform represented a heck of a lot more to the community than just a uniform. It represented organization. The racist power structure recognized us as being organized and they hated it. But the Black community, even the elderly mother would say “Lord, them young men show is sharp. Them young men and young women sure are sharp and clean and organized.” This is one thing Black people needed. It’s a safety valve for developed consciousness. To the brother on the block, the lumpen, “Man, them dudes show is sharp. Baby, I show wish I had me some knows and some pimp socks like that,” you know what I mean? But at the same time, it gave us a chance to talk with people about the ten-point platform and program really what we were about.”

Unfortunately for the Panthers, their attempt to differentiate themselves from street gangs and hoodlums failed to increase their membership numbers significantly. Nonetheless, the moment that Huey P. Newton, Bobby Seale, and Lil’ Bobby Hutton emerged from their vehicle, they caused a significant buzz throughout the Bay Area.

According to Elaine Brown, fear was the greatest obstacle the African-American community faced on its path to liberation.

The first question for black people is to get past fear, to see past the monolith to the man. That’s why we started using the word ”pig,” a detestable image that takes away the image of omnipotence. A pig, whether running loose in the ghetto with a gun or sitting on Wall Street or in the White House, is a man who can bleed like a man and fall like a man.

Panther leaders hoped to wield the Panther Patrols as an Excalibur that slew Bay Area African-Americans perception of law enforcement officers’ omnipotence.

Newton realized that theory alone was incapable of trumping African-Americans fear of Bay Area officers. Ironically, fear prevented local Blacks from moving toward liberation. Newton speculated that only public confrontations held the potential to remove the veneer of omnipotence that simultaneously cloaked officers and convinced Black urbanites that joining the Panther Party was suicidal.

Huey P. Newton recalls the Panther Patrols initial purpose below.

Out on patrol, we stopped whenever we saw the police questioning a brother or a sister. We would walk over with our weapons and observe them from a safe distance so that the police could not say we were interfering with the performance of their duty. We would ask the community members if they were being abused. Most of the time, when a policeman saw us coming, he slipped his book back into his pocket, got into his car, and left in a hurry. The citizens who had been stopped were as amazed as the police at our sudden appearance.

I always carried law books in my car. Sometimes, when a policeman was harassing a citizen, I would stand off a little and read the relevant portions of the penal code in a loud voice to all within hearing distance. In doing this, we were helping to educate those who gathered to observe these incidents. If the policeman arrested the citizen and took him to the station, we would follow and immediately post bail. Many citizens came right out of jail and into the Party, and the statistics of murder and brutality by policemen in our communities fell sharply. 

Dr. James Thomas Jones III

© Manhood, Race and Culture, 2017

Excerpt from Creating Revolution as they Advance: A Narrative History of the Black Panther Party for Self-Defense

Available at Barnes & Noble, Amazon, and every location where great books are sold.

Thug University: How the Posturing of some Black Males on Collegiate Campuses Must be Challenged

One of the more peculiar inside jokes shared among those raised in “the hood” is that when someone is sentenced to prison, this individual is on his way to ‘college’; meaning he is away from the community receiving an education in criminality and bound to return with an advanced criminal skill set. President Barack Hussein Obama’s ‘My Brother’s Keeper’ is an initiative aimed at preventing such college visits.

The African-American community has known long before President Barack Hussein Obama arrived on the national political scene that obama2there was a crisis concerning Black boys. I know that these initiatives have been around for at least thirty-years as I was previously a participant in such programs. Considering that Malcolm X’s admonishment that a person is merely the sum of their life experiences, I attribute a portion of my current success to such initiatives.

My participation with outreach programs specifically aimed at uplifting African-American males provided me with my first opportunity to visit a collegiate campus, attend/participate in an academic conference, and receive mentorship at both the undergraduate and graduate levels by unbelievable faculty members at THE Ohio State University, my alma mater.

With hindsight I can attest with extreme clarity that it was the latter occurrence, the opportunity to be mentored that has proven most beneficial in regards to my future endeavors. It was during mentorship sessions that I learned how to “be” inside of a collegiate classroom, an academic conference, a workshop, and a symposium; just as importantly, I had lessons my parents had taught me reiterated behind closed doors that I had done absolutely nothing to earn the opportunities being placed in front of me, it was an extended line of my elders who had facilitated this moment, and since I had not created these opportunities, I had absolutely no right to behave in a manner that would cause these opportunities to cease. Put simply, we, meaning a larger community, have worked tirelessly for you to even be allowed to compete in the collegiate arena, don’t you dare get out there and embarrass us at any moment, at any time, or for any reason.

Such experiences and mentorship makes my current status as a tenured professor of African-American studies surreal. I am on the other side of the desk and charged with the responsibility to keep the tradition from whence I emerged alive and well.

Although I, and many of my colleagues, concentrate upon keeping the traditions going; the truth is that the process of mentoring today’s African-American male collegian is markedly different from anything I could have imagined. Ironically, I have had an up-close view of the dynamic decade long process that facilitated collegiate campuses transformation from institutions of higher learning to what can be best termed “Thug University” for a significant portion of African-American males.

From the stage that I lecture on, I can attest that the past decade has been a period of dynamic change in regards to the African-American male persona on collegiate campuses, a shift that has been greatly prodded by Hip-Hop Culture. Put simply, much of the ignorance infecting so many African-American male collegians is an outgrowth of Hip-Hop Culture, Rap Music and Videos in particular.

As previously discussed, I participated in several initiatives aimed at saving ‘the endangered black male’. The logic behind such initiatives Collegewas that there needed to be some mechanism that provided “historically marginalized minority populations” access to higher education institutions. The most significant obstacle preventing our inclusion was an entity referred to as institutional racism; meaning, that the entire system operated in a manner that individuals such as myself, regardless of our best efforts, would never gain access. To their credit, policy makers and government officials took decisive action by allocating funds for African-American male initiative programs that worked to combat occurrences of institutional racism.

I am certain that those battling for our inclusion during the eighties considered their battle with institutional racism a Herculean effort, little did they know, a few decades later there would be a far more enchanting enemy that would make earlier battles with institutional racism look like taking candy from a baby.

The latest frontier in the battle to save African-American males must be fought against a much slicker enemy, one that the vast majority of African-American males admire, embrace, and seek intimate knowledge, that enemy is Hip-Hop Culture.

Despite the plethora of outreach programs being created to influence/guide African-American males down a productive path, the truth is that for a significant population of our males, rap icons such as Rick Ross, YG, and Young Jeezy hold more sway over their values and worldview than any initiative could ever hope to. Now this is by no means suggesting that such initiatives need to be ceased, as many participants, such as myself, will maximize the opportunity, however, the administrators of such initiatives are in for a rude awakening if they believe that exposure to collegiate campuses or professional mentors is sufficient to stem the omnipresent, seemingly omnipotent, influence of today’s rap artists on this latest generation of African-American males.

The above assertion is particularly disconcerting for someone who to this day holds Rap Music near and dear to my heart. I was literally incubated by Hip-Hop culture and its musical wing, Rap Music; entities that paved the way for first my politicization and my pursuit of a career of the mind.

Outside of my parents voluminous influence, my mind was molded by Public Enemy’s It Takes a Nation of Millions to Hold Us Back, Boogie Down Productions Edutainment, Brand Nubian’s One for All, X-Clan’s To The East Blackwards, and Paris’ The Devil Made Me Do It. As I reconstruct my past, it is clear that the youth culture I was steeped in was not only politically progressive, but also created by young African-Americans to serve the interests of young African-Americans. Unfortunately, the days of yesteryear are long gone.

If the saying that a tree is best known by the fruit it bears is true, one needs to look no further than the current state of young African-American males to discern that Hip-Hop culture is doing untold damage by curtailing their worldview and opportunities.

As stated in his tour de force, Things Done Changed “Back in the days, our parents used to take care of us. Look at ‘em now, they even fucking scared of us.” The antics/attitude/actions of African-American males have made many of their parents, grandparents, aunts, and uncles scared of them. Why should previous generations not be afraid of these recent manifestations of African-American manhood with its proclivity for drug abuse, alcoholism, misogyny, profanity, sagging pants and anti-social behavior? All foreign characteristics to how the majority of our people have lived throughout the annals of time.

Unbeknownst to the young men who are attempting to serve two masters, one being the altar of collegiate studies and the other the altar of ‘keepin it real’ Hip-Hop Culture, they have signed up for an sagging pantsimpossible task; in fact, it will the latter of the two that will always win out as it invariably taps into the carnal nature of mankind. The young men currently in the throes of a nihilistic homo-erotic thug culture fail to realize that they are an aberration to the way that educated African-American men have lived for centuries. The alluded to individuals entire existence contradicts storied traditions of honorable, smooth, articulate, educated, well dressed brothers who were in leadership positions in both their public and private lives. The smooth suave and debonair African-American man has been replaced with young men whose lack of style, and trust me a measure of style is not conveyed by adorning one’s body with overpriced gaudy European clothing that was not created with you in mind, is rivaled only by their inability to verbally express themselves.

The proverbial elephant in the room regarding African-American collegians desperation to be included in this type of lifestyle is an often ignored query of ‘what is the payoff for relinquishing long-standing African-American cultural traditions in favor of adopting behavior that would shame a nation of uncultured savages?’ Apparently the impetus behind the actions and mindset of so many African-American male collegians is a pursuit of ‘street credibility’ among those that they consider, or desperately desire to be like, uneducated criminal-minded thugs and hoodlums.

It is my fervent hope and prayer that African-American collegians quickly conclude that there is no salvation for them to be found in the streets of America, let alone any feelings of admiration to be hewn from a segment of society, criminal-minded African-American males, Gangster Disciples1that loathes their existence. If nothing else, I wish that the young men sitting in my classes realized that they are the best and brightest that our race has to offer and their allowing those who have less education than they do to direct their cultural values and goals makes as much sense as a tail wagging a dog. Young collegiate brothers you are supposed to be the head and not the tail in regards to setting the values for our community. So take your rightful places as the trend-setters and leaders within our community. Only you can reverse this tide of cultural dysfunction and flawed political priorities.

Dr. James Thomas Jones III

©Manhood, Race and Culture, 2017

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Author, Creating Revolution as They Advance: A Historical Narrative of the Black Panther Party for Self-Defense

Author, ‘Foolish’ Floyd: The Life & Times of an African-American Contrarian

Author, O’Bruni: An African-American Odyssey Home?

Committed to investigating, examining, and representing the African-American male, men, and manhood by offering commentary regarding the status of Black Men and Black Manhood as it relates to African-American Manhood, Race, Class, Politics, and Culture from an educated and authentic African-American perspective aimed at improving the plight of African-American men and African-American Manhood in regards to Politics, Culture, Education, and Social Matters.

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